Common Heritage – Aesthetica Short Film Festival, 2019

CommonHeritage_EmmaCritchley

Common Heritage had its film festival premiere screening at the Aesthetica Short Film Festival last month.

The film explores the drive to explore and exploit the sea floor, which means this once seemingly infinite landscape is now being carved up into territorial space. Common Heritage is an urgent response to the gold rush of deep-sea mining for rare earth minerals, exposing how reverberant layers of industrialisation have affected the way we relate to our environment. Highlighting fantasies we construct around exploration, the film draws into focus how these romanticized stages are in fact borders of conquest, annexed for geopolitical territory appropriation and mineral resources. In 1967, Arvid Pardo, the Maltese Ambassador to the UN gave a speech, which instigated the Common Heritage of Mankind principle. This speech narrated by science fiction writer, Gwyneth Jones is the provocation for the film. Dystopian science fiction motifs are harmonized with a poetic montage of deep-sea exploration archive footage. This juxtaposition sets up questions about our current state and how we should move forward into these frontiers.

More information about the festival here: https://www.asff.co.uk/

Science Gallery Venice – Earth Water Sky Residency

VSG WORKSHOPSI’ve just got back from Venice where I’ve been working with Professor Carlo Barbante and his team at Ca’ Foscari University on the International Ice Memory Project. As part of the research process I have also been running narrative and movement workshops at Ca’ Foscari University and with our partners Centro per la Scena Contemporanea (CSC) and Y-40 in Bassano del Grappa and Montegrotto Terme.

The Ice Memory Project aims to create a library of ice cores drilled from non-polar regions, which will be safely stored in Antarctica. From the ice cores and the air bubbles trapped in the ice, some of  which can be dated back as far as 18,000 BCE, scientists can reconstruct the Earth’s past climate and atmospheric composition. It is an invaluable record of climate change.

You can listen to Professor Barbante and myself talking about the project in this recent radio interview with Deutsche Welle and read more about the work here:

https://venice.sciencegallery.com/events/ice-breaker-art-and-science-workshop

https://venice.sciencegallery.com/news/dancing-art-and-environmental-science